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Report

Virtual workshop on Design and conduct of Implementation Research

Platform for Research Excellence Related to National Aims (PRERNA) -conducted by KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune

Day 1

The session on day 1 started with a welcome address by Dr. Sanjay Juvekar, KEMHRC, Vadu which was followed by a brief introduction to the PRERNA platform. This was followed by an introduction to the workshop. A pretest was conducted with some questions related to the core topics of Implementation research to assess the pre-workshop knowledge of the participants.

The first session on introduction to implementation research was conducted by Dr. Rajiv Bahl from Maternal Child Health, WHO. He started with the definition of implementation research (IR) as the search of knowledge for developing practical solutions to common but critical problems of health care interventions to improve their access quality and quantity-wise. For the conduct of implementation research, it is necessary that the efficacy of the intervention is proven. Though there is a slight overlap between the concept of implementation and operations research; IR is the method of diagnosing the problems in the health system. Hence it is different from efficacy/effectiveness research. He also explained about the three components of implementation research identified by WHO are as follows:-

  • Identification of problem in implementation and its determinants
  • Development of practical solutions
  • Introduction of an implementation strategy to overcome the problem

So it is important for the Research team and Implementation team to work together. Dr. Bahl also explained about the fact that how implementation research is helpful in improving government in health program development and help in effectively developing policies and strategies in the health sector. Lastly, he concluded that implementation research is about identifying the barriers to scale up activities and to achieve high coverage and quality.

For effective implementation research, be right research question has to be identified. Usually, IR is designed to questions starting with ‘HOW’. It is also important to define pragmatic objectives for the implementation research.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Introduction to Implementation Research: Dr. Rajiv Bahl  

 The next session on Theories and frameworks was conducted by Dr. Jose Martines. He described the theoretical approaches and models used in implementation science. He discussed the process models like Dynamic sustainability, EPIS (Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment), Dynamic adaptation, etc. He also discussed the RE-AIM model (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) of evaluating implementation.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- IR workshop- Theories and frameworks of Implementation Research: Dr. Jose Martines  

Both sessions ended with active question-answer sessions.

Activities of day 1 ended with a post-test on topics related to the day 1 session and were conducted by Aditi Apte, KEMHRC.

 

Day 2

The second day of the workshop started with a Recap of day 1, summarized by a young investigator from CMC, Vellore, Dr. Manikandan.

The first session on research questions and study designs in IR was conducted by Dr. Sanjay Juvekar and Dr. Sudipto Roy from KEMHRC, Pune. They described the types, terminologies and hierarchical role of IR and also discussed the steps in IR cycle i.e. contextualizing the challenge, development of the proposal, plan and implement, analysis of data, dissemination of findings, monitoring and evaluation. Consolidated framework of IR, Implementation outcomes and their descriptions of IR was also described. IR designs such as pragmatic research, effectiveness implementation hybrid trials, mixed-method designs, quality improvement studies, participatory action research, realistic review etc. were also discussed.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Research questions & study designs for implementation research: Dr.Juvekar /Dr. Roy 

In the second session, Dr. Shamim Quazi, WHO gave an overview of analytical methods in IR studies. He explained about the physical, socioeconomic and cultural contexts of interventions and elements of health system. He also discussed the analytical methods for qualitative data such as participant observation, field observation, review documents, in depth interviews, focused Group discussion and for quantitative data such as structured observations, questionnaires etc. He mentioned about the phases of such acceptability, appropriateness, quality, fidelity, coverage etc. The session ended with questions and answers.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Overview of analytical methods in implementation research studies: Dr. Shamim A Qazi 

In the second half of day 2, some successful examples of IR were discussed. These included a brief description of an ongoing implementation research on a government health program for management of high-risk pregnancies in tribal communities in Pune district: barriers, facilitators and scalability’ by Rutuja Patil, KEMHRC, Pune. Later, Sharmila Majumdar, SAS, New Delhi described the successful implementation of Kangaroo Mother Care in Haryana for low birth weight babies.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Demonstrating implementation of scale-up of Kangaroo Mother Care in Haryana: Dr.Mazumder 

Sudipto Roy covered another example of implementation research by the KEM team on the feasibility of the implementation of simplified management of young infants with possible serious bacterial infection when a referral is not feasible in tribal areas of Pune district, Maharashtra, India.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Demonstrating implementation of management of PSBI in india : Dr. Sudipto Roy 

Last session of the day was conducted by Dr. Sanjay Juvekar and Rutuja Patil, KEMHRC on stakeholders in IR and challenges in stakeholder engagement in IR. They discussed the stakeholders in IR such as patients or participants, healthcare providers, researchers, implementers and policymakers etc, and modes of their engagement in IR process.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Stakeholder engagement in implementation research: Dr. Sanjay Juvekar 

Activities of day 2 ended with post-test 2 conducted by Dr. Aditi Apte, KEMHRC.

 

Day 3

The third and the final day of the workshop started with Recap of day 1, summarized by Ravi Shastri, SAS, New Delhi.

The first session on developing IR proposal was conducted by Dr. Sharmila Mujumdar from CHRD, SAS. She described the structure of the proposal as Introduction, Research design Project plan, Expected Impact and Supplements of IR. She mentioned the differences in the IR and routine research proposals. She explained in brief about developing the title, rationale, statement of the problem, research objectives, quality management, capacity building, dissemination plan, conceptual work, role, and responsibilities, etc. She also gave important tips about the reviewer’s perspectives.

Click here for the youtube video:- IR workshop- Points to consider while writing implementation research grant proposals: Dr. Mazumder 

This important session was followed by one-hour group activity in which all participants were grouped into three groups of about 22 participants and each group was given one of the following themes to design research questions. Discussion in each group was facilitated by a senior researcher. Each group also included a senior government official to provide inputs related to the need and feasibility of implementation.

Group

Theam

Facilitator

Government partners

1.

Infection during pregnancy and childhood

Samira Aboubaker         

MV Karnataki(UNICEF)

2.

Nutrition during pregnancy and childhood

Jose Martines

Suresh Dalpat (DD, HSHRC, Haryana)

3.

COVID-19

Sanjay Juvekar

Mukta Gadgil(SHSRC, Maharashtra)            

The groups were asked to develop one or two priority research questions related to the theme and present them to the larger audience at the end of the group activity. The overall session was coordinated by Samira Aboubaker, WHO. Each group came up with at least one research question which will be developed in the future into full proposals for implementation research. Dr. Jose Martines graciously agreed to mentor the participants for IR proposal development on select topics.

At the end of the session, Dr. Sudipto Roy and Dr. Sanjay Juvekar gave the vote of thanks.

The workshop was attended by 66 participants out of 73 registered participants. Feedbacks collected from participants were also mentioned that the workshop was informative and comprehensive. Participants also appreciated the discussion to well-conducted and all sessions were conducted in lucid language.

 

Nonita Dudeja (MBBS, MD (Community Medicine))

 A new young investigator has joined the organization on 20th July 2020. She is MD in community medicine.

 

 Engagement In Research Project:

Research Project

Role

in study

Status

Surveillance of enteric fever in India: a longitudinal community-based cohort

(New Delhi site)

Study

team

Completed

Establishment of an Urban Demographic and Health Surveillance Site

in Delhi to Study Disease-Specific Epidemiology and Conduct Future Vaccine Trials

Study

team

Ongoing

Estimating impact of COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on maternal

and perinatal health services in urban and peri-urban neighborhoods of India

Study

team

Completed

 

Under Preparation:

1. Acceptability of maternal influenza vaccine among pregnant women and healthcare providers- a systematic review

2. Association of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) practices with an incidence of Enteric Fever among children in New Delhi- India

3. Estimating impact of COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on maternal and perinatal health services in urban and peri-urban neighborhoods of India

  

Workshop/meeting/Conference:

Date City Country Name

27th Aug to 25th Sep 2020

Delhi Online virtual meeting

India

Training program on ‘Good Clinical Practices’ by the Clinical Development Services Agency (CDSA)

27th Sep to 29th Sep 2020

Delhi Online virtual meeting

India

Science meeting on ‘Respiratory Viral Infections of Public Health Concern in India: Current Situation, Epidemiology and Research Priorities’ conducted by CHRD, SAS, New Delhi

28th Oct to 2nd Nov 2020

Delhi Online virtual meeting

India

Training on ‘Establishment of demographic, development and environment surveillance site’ by National Biopharma Mission

3rd Dec to 5th Dec 2020

Delhi Online virtual meeting

India

Workshop on ‘Design and conduct of implementation research (IR) studies’ coordinated by Vadu Rural Health Program, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune, India

 

PhD Enrollments:

CHRD-SAS:

1. Ranadip Chowdhury: Role of Vitamin-D in infection, Growth, anemia and neurodevelopment.
University: University of Bergen, Norway.

2. Bireshwar Sinha: Effect of community initiated kangaroo mother care in low birth weight infants on infant breast milk intake, gut inflammation, maternal depressive symptoms and stress.
University: University of Bergen, Norway.

3. Ravi Upadhyay: Nutritional interventions during infancy to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in resource constrained settings.
University: University of Bergen, Norway (in process).

4. Tarun Shankar Choudhary: Not finalized as yet. Tentative area identified: Health System and Health Policy Research.
University: University of Bergen, Norway (in process).

CMC:

1. Sindhu Balakumar:“Impact of maternally derived antibodies and infant microbiota on the immunogenicity of Rotavirus vaccines in Indian infants”.
University: The Tamil Nadu Dr. MGR Medical University..

2. Nayana p Nair: Costing of diarrhoeal illness among under five children and the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in India.
University: Shree Chithira Thirunal Institute for Medical Science and Technology (SCTIMST), Thiruvananthapuram..

3. Arun KS: Effect of early childhood malnutrition and infections on the physical and cognitive development during the later stages of childhood.
University:Shree Chithira Thirunal Institute for Medical Science and Technology (SCTIMST), Thiruvananthapuram.

KEMHRC:

1. Sudipto Roy: Care-seeking practices of and barriers to care-seeking for pneumonia in children aged less than five years in tribal and non-tribal rural areas of Pune district, India.
University: University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

2. Aditi Apte: Nanotechnology for transdermal delivery of micronutrients for prevention and treatment of nutritional deficiencies’.
University: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay.

3. Rutuja Patil: To assess the feasibility of using a well-established Tele-consultation facility (Micro-health centre) in management of COPD and asthma in a resource constrained remote rural area.
University: University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

4. Hanif Shaikh: Effect of maternal influenza immunization on maternal and neonatal outcomes in Pune area.
University: Savitribai Phule Pune University.

 

How We Remember Dr. Bhan:

1. Ranadip Chowdhury:  We meet hundreds of people but very few people really touch our life. Then, suddenly we meet someone who changes our life forever. Prof. (Dr.) M.K Bhan was that ‘special’ person in my life. He was more than a mentor to me. His vision of life changed my way of thinking in life. He made tremendous contribution to my professional and personal life within a short span of time. Most of us set short targets in life and forget the big picture. We plan to achieve those short targets. Some of us achieve those targets and some do not. I was one such of persons till I met Dr. Bhan in 2013. But his vision of thinking beyond short personal targets influenced me most. Though time will tell, how much I learnt from him, I see myself a completely different person in 2020 compared to who I was in 2013. I am one few lucky students whom Dr. Bhan mentored in last 6-7 years. We shared many happy moments discussing new research ideas, politics, and football (though I am Liverpool and Real Madrid supporter). His intense knowledge of football was not known to many persons. I want to quote one sentence here which I would never forget. He once told me “Ranadip, do you know why I like you so much? Because you do not get afraid to ask questions”. I miss you Sir!!!

 

2. Bireshwar Sinha: We were the basement gang! Sir (Dr. Bhan) was and still is the most active and lively member of this gang. Whistling down the way he used to come in the morning greeting each one of us with a "high-five" and his signature smile. It was like a breath of fresh air, wiped away all our worries and charged us up to think afresh, new ideas! He used to say that the basement is the "think tank" of SAS. The best part of our day was to be with him all day and discuss any new ideas that crossed our mind while he worked-out on the cross-trainer. Sir was a like a user-friendly encyclopedia with constant source of new research ideas which he made look simple and easily comprehensible! Beyond academic discussions, loved to hear his views on politics, sports, agriculture, family – this is something that I miss the most! I am proud and privileged to be amongst his last batch of students. To me he was more than a mentor, he was like a father and a friend. Working with him has changed my outlook in life, both professionally and personally in a positive way. He has taught to make mature decisions thoughtfully and not to lose focus on the big picture. Why he was the best mentor one can ever have? - Because he was always available for discussion and prioritized us above anything else. He carefully listened to any issues that I had, provided his deep insights, and followed it up till the end. He molded his way into our hearts, inspired to do better and showed us the way. He taught us never to settle for anything but the best – learn from the best, collaborate with the best and deliver the best! His words made me feel fearless in expressing my thoughts, asking questions; he made me learn from my failures and pushed me do better. He told “You need to ask the right questions. Identify and work on a question that scores more than 8/10 – that will create your identity”. He used to call me his “writing partner” – this is my greatest compliment and award ever. But I must say, working with him, as much fun as it was, but was never easy – it took me at least 10-15 drafts to reach a level to meet his expectations. I think the most important lesson that I have learned and will try to pursue is to be a good person above anything else, care for your colleagues, work as a team and move forward together. He made it clear that alone you can reach up to only a certain limit but together it is possible to achieve anything! I know that he is always with us and is watching. His teachings will always guide us through the tough times! Sir, I will try my best to make you proud. Love you!

 

3. Ravi Prakash Upadhyay: Much of what I have learnt till date is attributed to the constant nurturance provided by Dr. Bhan. He was like a father figure who always cared about where I was heading towards, both professionally and on a personal front. He was always open to discussions, even if his perspectives were challenged. Very few people, that I have come across, hold this trait and that made our discussions even more interesting. He urged me to read, come up with interesting questions and thoughts and he always had time for me (and other YIs) for engaging in discussions. The warmth and love he used to shower is much yearned now. His principles, passion for good work and empathy towards all will continue to energize me to do excellent work. He used to say, “It is important to be a good researcher but more important and precious than that is to be a loving and kind human being”. This is deeply imbibed in how I see life as. Love you always!!

 

4. Tarun Shankar Choudhary: I had the privilege to work closely with Dr Bhan after I joined SAS as a young investigator. There was always something new to learn from him. My outlook of health research changed under his guidance. He was a mentor par excellence and connected with all young investigators at a personal level. He helped me identify my area of interest. Working with him was fun as well as challenging as he would never settle for anything, but the best. He is the teacher I respect most. But the part that I miss the most are the non-academic discussions. Love you Sir!!

 

5. Nitika: It was my good fortune that I could spend some time under Prof (Dr.) M.K. Bhan mentorship. Be it personal life or professional, his words were always like gems. There was a charisma in the way he used to talk and articulate the sentences. His thinking was crystal clear and more so, intentions for his students were also crystal clear. Sir was once mentioning how he was able to play the role of mentor so nicely. For this, Sir elaborated that when his students express their ideas, he never stopped them and let them fly through their thoughts, as stopping them at that stage will negatively affect the thinking capability and will demoralize them. I read somewhere that “think with so much conviction that it becomes reality”, and Sir used to talk with so much conviction that the person sitting with him start perceiving it as reality. I remember one more example from his guidance. Sir taught me how to put forward a important discussion point in a e-mail effectively, and mentioning/elaborating my thinking behind that will give the other person a hint that I have thought through the point before sending. And somehow, this point is applicable everywhere. I really miss you Sir!!

 

6. Sudipto Roy:Novelty and Relevance. The two words sum up my memories of and learnings from Dr. Bhan. While Dr. Bhan used these words with reference to conducting research with high quality and impact, I think of these two words to describe his personality. More often than not, he would come up with innovative ideas and interventions to resolve health issues of public health importance. He always seemed to have a solution for even the most difficult scientific problem and he always made this look easy, though I am sure it was not easy! He always remained calm, whatever the situation, and never once did I hear him raise his voice. He was always ready with useful advice whenever I or my colleagues approached him with a query. I have learned a lot about scientific temperament from Dr. Bhan and hope that I am able to imbibe at least a part of his temperament. His passing away is a big loss to the scientific world and personally, I will miss my interactions with him and an opportunity to learn more from him. My best wishes remain with his family.

 

7. Aditi Apte: I got to meet Dr. Bhan few times during my journey as a young investigator at KEMHRC, mostly during PRERNA TAG meetings. Despite this, hecould influencemy thoughts and goals in research through his teachings. He selflessly devoted his precious time for discussing our individual research goals, guided us through his immense knowledge and foresight and more importantly, created a genuine interest in public health research whenever he addressed us. He was a true visionary and a major force for creating PRERNA, a platform that aims to promote impactful and nationally relevant research in maternal and child health. He dreamt of creating an army of impactful public health researchers that would take the country to the next level. I consider myself privileged for having spent some precious moments with this eminent personality and received some pearls of wisdom from him. I will try my best to follow his teachings and contribute meaningfully to the field of health research.

 

8. Rutuja Patil: It is not important only to be successful but one should also be impactful”. This was how the conversation started when we (Kem YIs) met Dr. Bhan for discussions on our future path in PRERNA. Each of us was initially apprehensive about our personal interaction with Dr. Bhan. But his friendliness and openness eased out the conversation in a nice way. I got to meet him a few time during PRERNA meetings and enjoyed listening to him throughout. When I introduced me as a biotechnologist planning to work in the area of policy, Dr. Bhan asked me to define and absorb the skills and characteristics required for a person to be a policy expert. He predicted my research portfolio even when I wasn’t even closer to what I am doing now. He recommended me to work among other areas in the area of technology in public health research and look into policies around the use of technology in health systems so that my background is well utilized. He was farsighted and a visionary who touched our lives in many ways, so effortlessly.

 

9. Girish Dayma: It is said that “there is a direct corelation between the positive energy and positive results” and we cannot deny it when we look at the stalwart personality of Late Prof Dr. M K Bhan who was an institute in himself. His positive energy, vision and conviction resulted in a successful development of the fist indigenous rotavirus vaccine only teaches us what we can achieve if we have a 3D formula of Determination, Dedication, and Devotion. I was fortunate to meet and listen him during various meetings which I attended as a part of the team working on implementation and rollout of the rotavirus vaccine in the country. He always stressed upon the importance of the solidarity, partnership, and networking to carry forward the research agenda. He has left behind an enduring legacy which will continue to contribute in the field of the public health for years to come.

 

 

Ranadip Chowdhury

Achievements :

  • ­Completed Ph.D. from Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway, 2020
  • ­Selected as a DBT/Wellcome IA Intermediate Career Clinical and Public Health Fellow 2021-26
  • ­Working as a Research Scientist and Assistant Director at CHRD SAS, New Delhi since 2019
  • ­Graduated as a BMGF PRERNA Fellow 2014-2018
  • ­Global Nutrition Early Career Scholar Award by the American Society for Nutrition, 2018
  • ­Invited Speaker in 19th ISRHML International Conference entitled “Supporting, Protecting and Promoting Breastfeeding from Biology to Policy, Japan, 2018
  • ­Received research grants as Investigator from various National and International agencies
  • ­Published >­30 articles in scientific peer-reviewed journals

 

List of Publications (Since 2018):

1. Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Dhabahi N, Mazumder S, Upadhyay R, Sharma S, Sreepurna AT, Dewan R, Mittal P, Chellani H, Bahl R, Bahn MK, Bhandari N. Burden of preconception morbidity in women of reproductive age from an urban setting in North India. PLOS One. 2020; 15(6): e0234768

2. Gernand A, Berhane Y, Bhandari N, Chowdhury R, Jehan F, Khatry S, Kolsteren P, Lee CC A, Muhammad A, Shafiq Y, Taneja S, Tielsch J, Taylor L, Gallagher K, Christian P, Yan J, Roskosky M. Harmonization of Maternal Nutrition Trials – Finding and Creating Similarities in Protocols and Outcomes. CurrDevNutr. 2020 Jun; 4(Suppl 2): 1738

3. Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Dhabahi N, Mazumder S, Upadhyay R, Sharma S, Sreepurna AT, Dewan R, Mittal P, Chellani H, Bahl R, Bahn MK, Bhandari N. Impact of an integrated nutrition, health, water sanitation and hygiene, psychosocial care and support intervention package delivered during the pre- and peri-conception period and/or during pregnancy and early childhood on linear growth of infants in the first two years of life, birth outcomes and nutritional status of mothers: study protocol of a factorial, individually randomized controlled trial in India. Trials 2020;21:127.

4. Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Kvestad I, Hysing M, Bhandari N, Strand TA. Vitamin D status in early childhood is not associated with cognitive development and linear growth at 6–9 years of age in North Indian children: a cohort study. Nutrition Journal 2020;19:14. doi: 10.1186/s12937-020-00530-2.

5. Upadhyay RP, Taneja S, Chowdhury R, Strand TA, Bhandari N. Insights Image for "Effect of prebiotic and probiotic supplementation on neurodevelopment in preterm very low birth weight infants: findings from a meta-analysis". Pediatr Res. 2020 Apr;87(5):969.

6. Upadhyay R, Naik G,Choudhary TS, Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Bhandari N,Martines JC, Bahl R, Bhan MK. Cognitive and motor outcomes in children born low birth weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies from South Asia. BMC Pediatrics.2019; 19:35.

7. Gomes F, Bourassa MW, Adu-Afarwuah S, Ajello C, Bhutta ZA, Black R, Catarino E, Chowdhury R, Dalmiya N, Dwarkanath P, Engle-Stone R,Gernand AD, Goudet S, Hoddinott J, PernilleKæstel P, Manger MS, McDonald CM, Mehta S, Moore SE, Neufeld LM, Osendarp S, Ramachandran P, Rasmussen KM, Stewart C, Sudfeld C, West K, Bergeron G. Setting research priorities on multiple micronutrient supplementation in pregnancy. Ann.N.Y. Acad Sci. 2019. doi: 10.1111/nyas.14267. PubMed PMID: 31696532(Impact factor: 4.03)

8. Choudhary TS, Reddy NS, Apte A, Sinha B, Roy S, Nair NP, Sindhu KN, Patil R, Upadhyay RP, Chowdhury R. Delayed vaccination and its predictors among children under 2 years in India: Insights from the national family health survey-4. Vaccine 2019 Apr 17;37(17):2331-2339

9. Choudhary TS, Srivastava A, Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Bahl R, Martines J, Bhan MK, Bhandari N. Severe wasting among Indian infants

10. Taneja S, Chandola TR, Mohan SB, Mazumder S, Bhandari N, Kaur J, Arya N, Chowdhury R, Martines J, Bahl R, Bhan M. Mid Upper Arm Circumference as a predictor of Risk of Mortality in Children in a low resource setting in India. PLOS One. 2018; 13(6): e0197832.

11. Taneja S, Dalpath S, Bhandari N, Kaur J, Mazumder S, Chowdhury R, Mundra S, Bhan MK. Experiences from operationalising the Integrated Community Case Management Strategy for Childhood Pneumonia, Diarrhoea and Fever by Community Health Workers in a district in Haryana, India. ActaPediatrica2018;107 Suppl 471:80-88

12. Chowdhury R, Taneja S, Bhandari N, Strand TA. Bhan MK. Vitamin-D deficiency and mild to moderate anemia in young North Indian children: a secondary data analysis. Nutrition.2019;57:63-68.

13. Upadhyay R, Taneja S, Chowdhury R, Strand TS, Bhandari N. Effect of prebiotic and probiotic supplementation on neurodevelopment in preterm very low birth weight infants: findings from a meta-analysis. Pediatric Research. 2018.

 

 Workshop/meeting/Conference since 2018:

Date City Country Name

19th Jun 2020

Webinar

 

Presented in a webinar on Critical Appraisal of published manuscript”, by Institute of Child Health, kolkata

16th Jun 2020

Webinar

 

Attended webinar on “Preventing growth failure in infants less than 6m”by WHO

1st to 4th Jun 2020

Delhi Virtual conference

India

Attended few sessions in virtual conference “Nutrition 2020” by ASN from

28th May 2020

Delhi Virtual meeting

India

Attended Anaemia DSMB meeting

28th May 2020

Delhi Virtual meeting

India

Attended virtual meeting on “Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey (CNNS): Online Data Users’ Workshop"

14th May 2020

Delhi Virtual workshop

India

Attended virtual workshop on “Causal inference for complex observational data”

5th May 2020

Webinar

 

Attended webinar on “COVID-19 & Breastfeeding” by ISRHML

29th Apr 2020

Webinar

 

Attended webinar on “COVID-19 & Newborn” by WHO

31th Mar 2020

Delhi Virtual meeting

 

Attended virtual meeting on “Improving maternal nutrition: A review of evidence on the one-full meal program” by IFPRI.

3rd to 4th Mar 2020

Geneva

Switzerland

Attended WINGS DSMC meeting

Mar (postponed)

   

Poster entitled “Association between plasma cysteine and growth in Indian children 6-30 months old: a retrospective cohort study” in Micronutrient Forum 5th Global Conference (scheduled on March; Postponed due to COVID 19)

24th to 25th Feb 2020

Seattle

USA

Attended Maternal Harmonization workshop by BMGF, 24-25th February, 2020

26th Nov 2019

Delhi

India

Learning and experience sharing meeting Pneumonia and Post Natal Care by Save the Children

31th Oct 2019

Delhi

India

Early Growth Failure - Identification & Management” meeting - The Pediatric And Adolescent Nutrition Society, NCoE-SAM, Kalawati Saran Children’s Hospital & UNICEF

24th Sep 2019

Delhi

India

Delivering for Nutrition in India: Insights from Implementation Research by IFPRI

9th to 14th Sep 2019

Kalyani

India

Attended as facilitator in SAS-NIBMG advanced course on clinical epidemiology and genetic methods

3rd Sep 2019

Delhi

India

KnIT SAC meeting

24th Jul 2019

Delhi

India

WINGS review meeting with Dr. Parul

19th Jul 2019

Delhi

India

Conditional Cash Transfer meeting in ICMR

21th May 2019

Delhi

India

ICDS, THR by IFPRI

6th May 2019

Delhi

India

Constitution of a Task Force at ICMR for study protocol on ‘Conditional Cash Transfer at ICMR'

1st to 3rd May 2019

Delhi

India

Institutional Collaborative meeting with Dr. Per group

30 Apr 2019

Dubai

UAE

Pregnancy Risk stratification meeting by BMGF

24 Apr 2019

Delhi

India

Meeting in NITI Aayog for preparation of Job Aids for community workers

4th to 15th Mar 2019

Bergen

Norway

MEDMET course

17th and 18th Jan 2019

Delhi

India

Linear Growth and Imprint TAG meeting

11th Jan 2019

Delhi

India

ICMR Anemia meeting

Nov 2018

Delhi

India

HBGDKi proposal presentation at BIRAC

Nov 2018

Delhi

India

ICMR Meeting on Mid term Evaluation of Poshan Abhiyan

Nov 2018

Vellore

India

Still Birth Meeting in CMC Vellore

Oct 2018

 

Japan

19thISRHML conference; presentation on Breastfeeding and maternal health

Oct 2018

Delhi

India

Growth Failure and SAM in early Infancy consultation

Oct 2018

Delhi

India

ICMR Expert group meeting to review WHO revised ANC guidelines in Indian context and develop common proposal for feasibility testing; presentation on Current NHM guideline for ANC and coverage

Jul 2018

Delhi

India

SAS SPAC meeting

Jul 2018

Delhi

India

DBT EC meeting

Jul 2018

Delhi

India

Strengthening Nutrition Services in Antenatal Care at Facility and Community Level

Jun 2018

Bergen

Norway

Bergen Summer Research School workshop on Fair Priority setting in Global Health

Apr 2018

Delhi

India

Critical Public Health Consequences of the Double Burden of Malnutrition and the Changing Food Environment in South and Southeast Asia

Apr 2018

Shimla

India

National Nutrition Mission discussion in Himachal Pradesh with state officials.

Mar 2018

Lillehammer

Norway

Applied Logistic regression Workshop by STANLEY LEMESHOW

Mar 2018

Delhi

India

Critical Public Health Consequences of the Double Burden of Malnutrition and the Changing Food Environment in South and Southeast Asia